23 Sep 17

Priorslee Lake and The Flash

12.5°C > 14.0°C: Low overcast with a few breaks and later some very light drizzle in the air. Calm start with light / moderate SSE breeze springing up. Good visibility

Sunrise: 06:56 BST

Priorslee Lake: 06:00 – 07:25 // 08:15 – 09:30

(99th visit of the year)

Notes from today:
- the cygnets’ new rings were read today: 7IVS, 7IVU
- all the outbound geese went over at 06:00 when it was too dark to count them properly – especially as I was still being blinded by very bright LED street lights along Teece Drive
- Gadwall gone
- all but 6 of the 16 Mallard flew off pre-dawn
- my second fly-by Hobby of the week
- a party of 26 House Martins was high overhead moving S at 07:25; another 4 at 07:30. They seem to have mostly gone from around Newport so these were likely migrants rather than local birds
- the first Rooks were headed out before my usual ‘marker’ – typically they start passing a few minutes after the first Wren starts calling: today 105 Rooks had already flown over before any Wrens awoke
- today’s counts of the Pied Wagtails on the football field: just 2 at 07:20; 18 at 08:15; and 2 again at 09:30. Being a Saturday there were many more early dog-walkers using the field and this may well have affected the birds. The two recorded flying over were neither coming from nor going to this area
- the Blackcap heard making its ‘tac-tac’ calls was rather out of season. Local breeding birds have likely gone but in any event, and unlike Chiffchaffs, are usually silent once they start to move. Our wintering birds come from the Continent and are unlikely to have arrived yet: they too are usually silent until warm Spring days encourage them to sing
and
- no moths on the lamps today
- three different species of spider on the lamps today: certainly a Garden Spider (Arameus diadematus)
- the following additional plant noted in flower
- Water Forget-me-not (Myositis palustris)
- also around the yacht club dump / bonfire site were two garden escapes
- Montbretia (Crocosmia sp.) – a native of southern Africa
- Ice Plant-type (Hylotelephium sp.)

On with the bird totals

Birds noted flying over the lake:
- c.10 Greylag Geese outbound (see notes)
- c.12 Canada Geese outbound (see notes)
- 2 (?♂) Tufted Ducks
- 1 Hobby
- 1 Lesser Black-backed Gull
- 38 Wood Pigeons
- 76 Jackdaws
- 181 Rooks
- 3 Starling
- 2 Pied Wagtails

Hirundines etc. seen today
- 6 Barn Swallows
- 30 House Martins

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 7 (1) Chiffchaffs
- 1 (0) Blackcap

The counts from the lake area
- 2 + 3 Mute Swans
- 1 Greylag Goose still
- 16 (?♂) Mallard
- 27 (11?♂) Tufted Ducks
- 2 Grey Herons
- 7 + 8 (2 broods) Great Crested Grebes
- 7 (2 juveniles) Moorhens
- 129 Coots
- 66 Black-headed Gulls
- 2 Lesser Black-backed Gulls
- 1 Kingfisher

One of the cygnets shows its new Darvic ring – 7IVS.

This is 7IVU: reading these would be hard without a camera and ‘sports’ setting for multiple shots. Leaves one to read though we could surmise it would be 7IVT!

An adult Great Crested Grebe with another large meal.

A hungry juvenile approaches.

Getting it together.

“Try that junior”.

Ready to go down the hatch.

Going, going ..

Almost gone!

A Black-headed Gull chasing a 1st winter Lesser Black-backed Gull. Quite why they tend to do this to lone large gulls is unclear.

This juvenile Black-headed Gull is very late starting its moult to 1st winter.

A nice plan view of the 1st winter Lesser Black-backed Gull.

This adult winter-plumaged Lesser Black-backed Gull shows considerable head-streaking.

Spider_1: the long front legs suggest a Tetragnatha (stretch spider) sp. but I cannot find a match from a search on the web.

Spider_2: another species that will take some more work to ID.

This is the garden escape Montbretia (Crocosmia sp.).

This is also probably a garden escape – an Ice Plant-type (Hylotelephium sp.). We see from the leaves this is a succulent.

(Ed Wilson)
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The Flash: 07:35 – 08:10

(77th visit of the year)

Notes from here
- the cygnets here have also been ringed: blue Darvic 7HVN and 7HVP
- all the geese, apart from the white feral bird, flew in while I was walking around
- could not find any juvenile Great Crested Grebes this morning: worrying as I doubt they were fledged
- some of the Black-headed Gulls were perching on the bridges parapets across the cut-offs, something they only ever seem to do in Autumn

Birds noted flying over
- 8 Feral Pigeons (1 group)
- 4 Wood Pigeons
- 2 Jackdaws

Hirundines etc. noted
None

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 3 (1) Chiffchaffs

The counts from the water
- 2 + 2 Mute Swans
- 33 Greylag Geese
- 17 Canada Geese
- 1 white feral goose
- 17 (9♂) Mallard
- 37 (16?♂) Tufted Ducks again
- 2 Great Crested Grebes
- 3 (1 juvenile) Moorhens
- 10 Coots yet again
- 92 Black-headed Gulls
- 1 Kingfisher again

A Moorhen was once more calling from the upper pool between the lake and The Flash; a Chiffchaff was also calling in the area.

A 1st winter Black-headed Gull on a parapet here. An adult’s bill and leg would be much more orange.

A whole gaggle of Black-headed Gulls on the bridge rail – all 1st winters too for some reason.

(Ed Wilson)

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On this day..........
2015
Priorslee Lake
Today's Sightings Here

2013
Priorslee Lake
2 Whinchat
3 Snipe
1 Wigeon
(John Isherwood)

2011
Priorslee Lake
Common Sandpiper
(Ed Wilson)

2008
Priorslee Lake
Water Rail
(Ed Wilson)

2007
Priorslee Lake
Ruddy Duck
Kingfisher
696 Swallows, House Martins and Sand Martin
55 Meadow Pipit
(Ed Wilson)

22 Sep 17

Priorslee Lake and The Flash; then Trench Lock Pool and Middle Pool

5.5°C > 11.5°C: Fine and clear start with a few patches of medium-level cloud. Very good visibility above some mist patches. After 08:00 the mist rolled in and visibility became poor with low cloud at the lake. Trench was below the mist with some breaks with sun. Calm start with light / moderate S breeze springing up

Sunrise: 06:55 BST

Priorslee Lake: 06:30 – 07:20 // 08:05 – 09:15

(98th visit of the year)

Notes from today:
- the cygnets all had a trial flight this morning: did not quite manage lift-off
- the Greylag Goose seen yesterday lurking in the reeds was today on the dam-face: seems to be injured (or unwell) and unable to fly
- in addition to the 23 outbound Canada Geese another 12 pitched in to the lake and stayed a while despite the half-hearted attempt by the cob Mute Swan to move them
- probably many more Tufted Ducks present initially: I left checking until after I returned from The Flash and the light was better. By that time a wind-surfer was setting up and many birds seemed to have left (most of the Mallard had gone too)
- a Little Grebe made a typically brief appearance away from the reeds
- an additional adult Great Crested Grebe today
- lower count of Rooks today may be due to my being distracted by an oddly-behaving grebe sp. Several parties of Jackdaws were my first for many weeks here. After the arrival of the mist two late passing birds became ‘lost’ and landed in the trees along the N side – something I have only ever seen them do in fog
- today’s counts of the Pied Wagtails on the football field: 16 at 07:15; 15 at 08:05; and 9 at 09:10
- a Meadow Pipit over was my first of the autumn here
- a Reed Bunting noted flying out of the W end reeds. Like all buntings this species becomes very hard to find after the breeding season – unless you can find where they have gathered to feed on stubbles or seeds
and
- no moths on the lamps today
- a Garden Spider (Arameus diadematus) on one of the lamps again
- the following additional plant noted in flower
- Red Deadnettle (Lamium purpureum) (new this year here!)
- Creeping Thistle (Cirsium arvense) (new for me)
- many fruiting bodies of fungus found by the football field: provisionally identified as Fairy Ring Champignon (Marasmius oreades)

On with the bird totals

Birds noted flying over the lake:
- 2 Greylag Geese (singles)
- 23 Canada Geese (5 parties): all outbound
- 3 Lesser Black-backed Gulls
- 13 Wood Pigeons
- 58 Jackdaws
- 99 Rooks
- 1 Meadow Pipit

Hirundines etc. seen today
None

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 7 (2) Chiffchaffs

The counts from the lake area
- 2 + 3 Mute Swans
- 1 Greylag Goose again
- 12 Canada Geese
- 2 (1♂) Gadwall again
- 20 (?♂) Mallard
- 8 (0♂) Tufted Ducks (see notes)
- 1 Grey Heron
- 8 + 8 (2 broods) Great Crested Grebes
- 10 (4 juveniles) Moorhens
- 127 Coots
- >150 Black-headed Gulls
- 12 Lesser Black-backed Gulls

A touch of mist in the distance but basically a fine and clear start.

The cygnets were trying to fly today. This one is composing itself after a rather ungainly touch-down. Note that it now wears a blue Darvic ring – this has been added this week and I need to read them!

Mr. Angry! A drake Tufted Duck!

Even though this bird is not in breeding plumage – when the flanks would be gleaming white – we see a hint of green-gloss on the head.

A classic first winter Lesser Black-backed Gull with a black bill with only a hint of a pale base, extensive dark around the eye, dark brown back with white-fringed but otherwise solid black tertials and black primaries.

A different bird, also a first winter Lesser Black-backed Gull with the black bill even more prominent.

A trio of adult Lesser Black-backed Gulls showing variable amount of winter plumage head-spotting.

This seems to be Red Deadnettle (Lamium purpureum). Not a flower I expected to see at this time of year: the literature says it flowers until November. Did not look much like the Spring examples with the leaves rather old and mottled. That said I had not recorded it here this year.

The leaves and rather small flower-head suggest this a Creeping Thistle (Cirsium arvense). New for me here but I am sure I have overlooked it amongst all the other thistles around the lake.

This Garden Spider (Arameus diadematus) covered in dew.

Adjacent to the football field were several groups of the same fungus. It seems likely these are Fairy Ring Champignon (Marasmius oreades), common in short grass and not always in the classic ‘fairy ring’.

A close-up of another group.

And a look at the stems.

More Autumn colours.

(Ed Wilson)

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The Flash: 07:25 – 07:55

(76th visit of the year)

Notes from here
- asked around this morning but no one could give me news about the two cygnets that went missing between my visits on 31 August and 18 September. It was suggested that might have been taken in to care having become entangled with fishing gear. I would have expected it to have been returned by now
- low count of Mallard today
- a Grey Wagtail here again

Birds noted flying over
- 22 Feral Pigeons (1 group)
- 2 Pied Wagtails

Hirundines etc. noted
None

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 2 (0) Chiffchaffs again

The counts from the water
- 2 + 2 Mute Swans
- 5 Canada Geese
- 1 white feral goose
- 15 (9♂) Mallard
- 32 (>12♂) Tufted Ducks again
- 2 + 1 (1 brood) Great Crested Grebes again
- 2 (both juveniles) Moorhens
- 10 Coots again
- 24 Black-headed Gulls
- 1 Kingfisher

A Moorhen was yet again calling from the upper pool between the lake and The Flash; and a drake Mallard flew from the lower pool to the upper pool.

(Ed Wilson)

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Trench Lock Pool: 09:30 – 10:05 // 10:45 – 10:50

(23rd visit of the year)

Notes from here
- the cygnets here have been ringed and I read 1VI, 1VJ and 1VL before they all entered the water: one of the adults has also been ringed – 1ZP

Birds noted flying over here
None

Hirundines etc. noted
None

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 4 (0) Chiffchaffs

The counts from the water
- 2 + 8 Mute Swans
- 5 Canada Geese
- 16 (11) Mallards [also 1 ‘feral’ bird]
- 4 (2♂) Tufted Ducks
- 1 Grey Heron
- 2 + 3 (1 brood?) Great Crested Grebes
- 3 Moorhens
- 113 (5 juveniles) Coots
- 5 Black-headed Gulls
- 1 Lesser Black-backed Gull

Plants not checked here today.

The distinctly feral Mallard-type duck here – we can tell there is Mallard in the genes by the curly-tail and that also means it a duck. Where the rest comes from is anyone’s guess.

A shot capturing the wing pattern of a flying first-winter Black-headed Gull.

And again.

(Ed Wilson)

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Middle Pool: 10:10 – 10:40

(19th visit of the year)

Notes
- the Mute Swans have lost one of their brood, with the five surviving birds looking healthy
- just one juvenile Great Crested Grebe now present from the brood of 4 that hatched in July
- my largest count of Coots here after what seemed to be a good breeding season at this site. Four birds still obvious juveniles

Birds noted flying over here
None

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 1 (0) Chiffchaff

The counts from the water
- 2 + 5 Mute Swans
- 6 Greylag Geese
- 62 Canada Geese
- 25 (16♂) Mallard [no ‘feral’ birds noted]
- 10 (2♂) Tufted Duck
- 1 Cormorant
- 2 + 1 Great Crested Grebes
- 9 (3 juveniles) Moorhens
- 29 (4 juveniles) Coots

Plants not checked here either.

The reflection of the trees makes the water look green. Here we see a duck Tufted Duck – the white on the face is not extensive enough for a duck (Greater) Scaup and there is the tell-tale hint of a tuft on the rear crown.

A drake Tufted Duck against the same green-looking water.

Just to prove that Great Crested Grebes are omnivorous here is an adult eating weed.

A juvenile Moorhen. At this age they lack the red shield of the adult but can most easily be separated from juvenile Coots (that similarly lack their white shield) by the white line along the flanks. It is paler than the out-of-focus adult behind it, but distinctly grey: a juvenile Coot would look blacker. Note too the white undertail, frequently exposed when moving away from danger.

An adult Coot also against the green-looking water. A fierce red eye.

Autumn colours here too.

(Ed Wilson)

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On this day..........
2015
Priorslee Lake
Today's Sightings Here

2008
Priorslee Lake
Water Rail
Common Redstart
(Ed Wilson)

The Flash
The drake Mallard x Pintail has returned for the 5th year at least 
(Ed Wilson)

2007
Priorslee Lake
Gadwall
Redwing
(Ed Wilson)

21 Sep 17

Priorslee Lake and The Flash

13.5°C throughout: Cloudy at low level with occasional mainly light drizzle. Moderate / fresh S wind. Good visibility

Sunrise: 06:53 BST

Priorslee Lake: 06:30 – 07:20 // 08:05 – 09:35

(97th visit of the year)

Two surprises today, both here

A drake (Greater) Scaup was a distinctly unusual find at this date – I associate this species with deep winter and early spring

Also an usual date for a Reed Warbler only located because it was sub-singing from deep within vegetation along the N side and nowhere near any reeds. I tried ‘pishing’ but it wasn’t about to show itself. Our breeding birds leave in late August so this was no doubt a migrant from further north

Other notes from today:
- a Greylag Goose was noted lurking in the reeds in the NE area apparently to avoid attention from the resident Mute Swans
- Tufted Ducks were unusually ‘jumpy’ this morning making an accurate count hard to take
- Black-headed Gulls back to usual numbers this morning: probably more birds involved as there was considerable movement to and from the fields to the E
- a count of the Pied Wagtails on the football field at 08:05 produced 42. I did a recount at 09:30 when just 21 were noted
and
- no moths on the lamps today
- the following additional plant noted in flower
- Perennial Sow-thistle (Sonchus arvensis)

On with the bird totals

Birds noted flying over the lake:
- 1 Greylag Goose
- 2 (?♂) Tufted Ducks
- 6 Lesser Black-backed Gulls
- 33 Wood Pigeons
- 17 Jackdaws
- 188 Rooks
- 13 Starlings (2 groups)

Hirundines etc. seen today
- 9 Barn Swallows

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 5 (2) Chiffchaffs
- 1 (1) Reed Warbler

The counts from the lake area
- 2 + 3 Mute Swans
- 1 Greylag Goose
- 1 (0♂) Eurasian Wigeon remains
- 2 (1♂) Gadwall remain
- 10 (5♂) Mallard
- 33 (>7♂) Tufted Ducks
- 1 (1♂) (Greater) Scaup
- 1 Grey Heron
- 7 + 8 (2 broods) Great Crested Grebes again
- 8 (5 juveniles) Moorhens
- 125 Coots
- >160 Black-headed Gulls
- 3 Lesser Black-backed Gulls
- 1 Kingfisher again

Here we see the drake (Greater) Scaup. Note the fine vermiculations on the back to distinguish from drake Tufted Duck. Also the more rounded head-shape with no hint of a ‘tuft’ – always present on both sexes of Tufted Duck.

Ducks in the genus Aythya frequently hybridise and any claim to a (Greater) Scaup needs to be checked against possible hybrid characteristics. Here we see the typical small dark nail (tip) to the bill. This along with the complete absence of ‘tuft’ allows a confident ID of drake (Greater) Scaup.

Here we see the drake (Greater) Scaup (on the left) with a drake Tufted Duck for comparison. Note the slightly greater bulk of the (Greater) Scaup [apologies for the quality – it was at extreme range on a dull and drizzly morning].

The date suggests that this is a Perennial Sow-thistle (Sonchus arvensis) – other species of sow-thistle should have finished flowering by now.

This is a different plant but I think shows one of the flowers, closed in the dull weather, and with a free-loader. [without a shot showing the leaves it is impossible to eliminate one of the many species of hawkweed / hawkbit, but I think not].

A Garden Spider lurking under the roof of the shelter.

(Ed Wilson)

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The Flash: 07:30 – 08:00

(75th visit of the year)

Notes from here
- apart from the non-flying white feral goose no geese at all seen! As the feral bird seemed paired with a Canada Goose that appeared unable to fly exactly where they all have gone is unclear
- again just 1 juvenile Great Crested Grebe and well away from the adults who seemed rather more interested in starting another brood
- large number of Black-headed Gulls with the biggest ‘instant’ count shown. Birds flying in and out all the while, apparently commuting from the lake

Birds noted flying over
None

Hirundines etc. noted
None

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 2 (0) Chiffchaffs

The counts from the water
- 2 + 2 Mute Swans
- 1 white feral goose
- 32 (21♂) Mallard
- 32 (>12♂) Tufted Ducks
- 2 + 1 (1 brood) Great Crested Grebes
- 3 (2 juveniles) Moorhens
- 10 Coots
- >103 Black-headed Gulls

A Moorhen was again calling from the upper pool between the lake and The Flash: also record here was a Grey Squirrel.

(Ed Wilson)

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On this day..........
2015
Priorslee Lake
Today's Sightings Here

2011
Priorslee Lake
Kingfisher
Common Sandpiper
(Ed Wilson)

2008
Priorslee Lake
Wigeon
Water Rail
(Ed Wilson)

2007
Priorslee Lake
Kingfisher
(Ed Wilson)

20 Sep 17

Priorslee Lake and The Flash

10.0°C > 12.5°C: Mainly high cloud to start with low cloud by 07:00 and even some light drizzle. Light S wind. Very good visibility initially: good later in low cloud

Sunrise: 06:51 BST

Priorslee Lake: 05:45 – 07:20 // 08:05 – 09:35

(96th visit of the year)

Most of Monday ducks had moved on: the Gadwall will likely stay for the winter; a single duck Wigeon remains.

Unusual today was a group of at least 56 Pied Wagtails on the ‘football’ field adjacent to the Holy Trinity Academy. There were males, females and juveniles. None of those checked could be turned in to the continental race / species White Wagtail, a potential migrant at this date. It was my largest-ever total ‘on the ground’ and larger than any roost dispersal counts in recent years. All birds I had noted flying over the lake earlier were likely headed here and are not logged separately. This total was taken at the time all the pupils were arriving at the academy, so there may well have been others in the area

Also unusual were several parties of Starlings, totalling c.45 birds, flying low around the W end and briefly perching in the trees there. I assume they were feeding on the grass in the Ricoh grounds and being disturbed by the trucks moving around

Other notes from today:
- 6 of the Mallard flew out early today with 2 (of these?) flying in a few minutes later
- 4 of the Tufted Duck flew in before 06:20
- at least one more Great Crested Grebe this morning: as the locally raised juveniles get more and more independent and move around with and away from their parents it becomes hard to keep track of all these birds
- rather fewer gulls this morning and the initial arrival c.06:30 comprised just 8 birds. Rather more later but only half the number that was recorded Monday
- at last there seems to be a return of the dispersal of corvids pre-dawn: a party of 12 Jackdaws and 93 Rooks went over at 06:18. A scatter of stragglers after that
and
- two moths on the lamps: a Common Marbled Carpet and my first Engrailed for several years
- no bats confirmed this morning
- the following plants were omitted from yesterday’s ‘still in flower’ list (in no particular order)
- Herb Robert (Geranium robertianum)
- Red Valerian (Valeriana officinalis)
- Ox-eye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare) – single plant
- Rosebay Willow-herb or Fireweed (Chamerion angustifolium)
- Meadowsweet / Mead Wort (Filipendula ulmaria)
- Meadow Buttercup (Ranunculus acris)
- Wood Avens (Geum urbanum)
with the following provisionally ID-ed as new for me here
- Dwarf Thistle (Cirsium acaule)
- Saw-wort (Serratula tinctoria)

On with the bird totals

Birds noted flying over the lake:
- 7 Greylag Geese: 1 single outbound; party of 6 inbound
- 40 Canada Geese: 4 singles outbound; party of 36 inbound
- 8 Lesser Black-backed Gulls
- 1 Stock Dove again
- 27 Wood Pigeons
- 13 Jackdaws
- 114 Rooks
- 3 Mistle Thrushes

Hirundines etc. seen today
None

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 7 (1) Chiffchaffs

The counts from the lake area
- 2 + 3 Mute Swans
- 1 (0♂) Eurasian Wigeon
- 2 (1♂) Gadwall
- 16 (?♂) Mallard
- 29 (>15♂) Tufted Ducks
- 2 Grey Herons
- 7 + 8 (2 broods) Great Crested Grebes
- 14 (4 juveniles) Moorhens
- 129 Coots
- c.75 Black-headed Gulls
- 7 Lesser Black-backed Gulls
- 1 Kingfisher

“Red sky in the morning” ...

A slightly later view.

Just one Eurasian Wigeon present this morning. It came closer this morning so a better shot of this duck. Note the distinctive head shape and the orangey tone to the body.

Not too often you see a group of Goldfinches on the ground. The middle bird, at least, seems to be a first winter bird just acquiring its red face though they all look a bit scruffy and it may be no more than the annual moult.

And two more.

This moth is a specimen of The Engrailed. A variable species that now includes what used to be known as Small Engrailed. This specimen may be a late 2nd brood individual or perhaps an early 3rd brood.

Common Marbled Carpet is another very variable species of moth: this a fresh 2nd brood specimen of the rufous-tinged form. This form does not occur in the otherwise very similar Dark Marbled Carpet.

Another new flower for me and taxing my ability to ID. I think Saw-wort (Serratula tinctoria). If you know / think differently please let me know – indeed if you agree please let me know!

A close-up of the flowers.

Yet another provisional ID: this seems to be a Dwarf Thistle (Cirsium acaule). However all the literature suggests this grows on grazed areas on chalk which does not apply to Priorslee Lake. So? Perhaps the stones around the plant are creating a micro habitat for it.

Feel on safer ground here: the final flourish from Rosebay Willow-herb or Fireweed (Chamerion angustifolium).

Another I am reasonably confident about: I think this is Wood Avens (Geum urbanum) [aka Herb Bennett] just about at the end of its season, the leaves turning black and most of the petals having dropped from the small yellow flower. I first noted it this year as long ago as 11 May.

I noted yesterday that there was a single flower of Greater Willowherb (Epilobium hirsutum) between the lake and The Flash: here it is, actually two flowers on a single stem today. A small spider lurks on the left-hand flower.
(Ed Wilson)

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The Flash: 07:30 – 08:00

(74th visit of the year)

Highlight here was a sign of Autumn with an over-flying Meadow Pipit. This became my 68th species recorded around and over The Flash this year

Notes from here
- where have all the geese gone?
- just 1 juvenile Great Crested Grebes noted: however the juveniles seem pretty independent and may well have been elsewhere around the lake

Birds noted flying over
- 13 Feral Pigeons (2 groups)
- 2 Jackdaws
- 1Meadow Pipit
- 1 Mistle Thrush
- 1 Goldfinch

Hirundines etc. noted
None

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 3 (0) Chiffchaffs

The counts from the water
- 2 + 2 Mute Swans
- 1 Canada Goose
- 1 white feral goose
- 30 (18♂) Mallard
- 42 (>12♂) Tufted Ducks
- 2 + 1 (1 brood) Great Crested Grebes
- 5 (3 juveniles) Moorhens
- 6 Coots
- 3 Black-headed Gulls (all 1st winters)
- 1 Kingfisher

A Moorhen calling from the upper pool between the lake and The Flash was the only notable record here

(Ed Wilson)

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On this day..........
2015
Priorslee Lake
Today's Sightings Here

2011
Priorslee Lake
Common Sandpiper
(Ed Wilson)

2010
Priorslee Lake
Scaup
(Richard Vernon)


The Flash
Scaup
(Stuart Edmunds)

2008
Priorslee Lake
Tawny Owl
(Ed Wilson)

2005
Priorslee Lake
Kingfisher
(Ed Wilson)